“This film is really good!   It is a “must-see” for anyone interested in Guatemala and Mesoamerica.”

Ana Carlos, Guatemalan Filmmaker, Television Producer & Director

 

 

 

 

 

The Film In About 100 Words

 

Guatemala is the heart of the Maya world, home to one of the world’s founding civilizations, twenty-four indigenous languages, a wild and dramatic landscape, incredible biodiversity and a fascinating cultural menagerie of customs and traditions.

Unfortunately, the country has struggled to emerge from the shadows of a devastating earthquake and long and violent civil war.  The fallout from these tragedies has compelled many to leave their homes and travel north in search of a different life.

This carefully crafted film provides an insightful, heartfelt foundation for understanding a land and people who are worth getting to know, especially in an era when the cause and effect of migration is so hotly contested.

 

 

The Film In About 100 Words

 

Guatemala is the heart of the Maya world, home to one of the world’s founding civilizations, twenty-four indigenous languages, a wild and dramatic landscape, incredible biodiversity and a fascinating cultural menagerie of customs and traditions.

Unfortunately, the country has struggled to emerge from the shadows of a devastating earthquake and long and violent civil war.  The fallout from these tragedies has compelled many to leave their homes and travel north in search of a different life.

This carefully crafted film provides an insightful, heartfelt foundation for understanding a land and people who are worth getting to know, especially in an era when the cause and effect of migration is so hotly contested.

 

 

The Film In About 100 Words

 

Guatemala is the heart of the Maya world, home to one of the world’s founding civilizations, twenty-four indigenous languages, a wild and dramatic landscape, incredible biodiversity and a fascinating cultural menagerie of customs and traditions.

Unfortunately, the country has struggled to emerge from the shadows of a devastating earthquake and long and violent civil war.  The fallout from these tragedies has compelled many to leave their homes and travel north in search of a different life.

This carefully crafted film provides an insightful, heartfelt foundation for understanding a land and people who are worth getting to know, especially in an era when the cause and effect of migration is so hotly contested.

Why We Made It

 

Documentary filmmaker Werner Herzog was right when he said, “You will learn more by walking from Canada to Guatemala than you’ll ever learn in film school.”

We didn’t have to walk there, or go to film school, to realize that few North Americans know much about their neighbor to the south.  But we were surprised to meet so many Guatemalans who lamented that “we don’t even know our own country.”

Confronted with an information deficit on both sides of the border, we believe that Guatemala’s story needs to be told, especially now that it is so easy to disparage people that we don’t know or dismiss things we don’t understand.

Unpacking 4,000 years of human history and culture in a place as nuanced and diverse as Guatemala is an audacious challenge.  But, we were determined to create an authentic sense of place and craft an engaging, truthful narrative that would stand up to critical analysis.  With that touchstone in mind, we went to work.

Now, the reviews are in – the film engages audiences, drives conversations and deepens our understanding of this mysterious land and enduring people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why We Made The Film

 

Documentary filmmaker Werner Herzog was right when he said, “You will learn more by walking from Canada to Guatemala than you’ll ever learn in film school.”

We didn’t have to walk to Guatemala or go to film school to realize that few North Americans know much about their neighbor to the south.  But we were surprised to encounter so many Guatemalans who lamented that “we don’t even know our own country.”

Confronted with this information vacuum on both sides of the border, we believed that Guatemala’s story needed to be told, especially now that it is so easy to disparage people that we don’t know, or dismiss things we don’t understand.

Unpacking 4,000 years of human history and culture in a place as nuanced and diverse as Guatemala is an audacious challenge. But, we were determined to create an engaging, truthful narrative that would stand up to scrutiny and create an authentic sense of place.

With that touchstone in mind, we went to work.  In the end, Guatemala: On the Edge of Discovery engages audiences, drives conversations and informs our understanding of this mysterious land and enduring people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why We Made The Film

 

Documentary filmmaker Werner Herzog was right when he said, “You will learn more by walking from Canada to Guatemala than you’ll ever learn in film school.”

We didn’t have to walk there or go to film school to realize that few North Americans know much about their neighbor to the south.  But, we were surprised to meet so many Guatemalans who lament that “we don’t even know our own country.”

Confronted with this information vacuum on both sides of the border, we believed that Guatemala’s story needed to be told, especially now that it is so easy to disparage people we don’t know or dismiss things we don’t understand.

We knew that unpacking 4,000 years of human history and culture in a place as nuanced and diverse as Guatemala would be an audacious challenge.  But we were determined to create an engaging, truthful narrative that would stand up to scrutiny and create an authentic sense of place.

With that touchstone in mind, we went to work.  In the end, Guatemala: On the Edge of Discovery engages audiences, drives conversations and informs our understanding of this mysterious land and enduring people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How We Made It

The film was produced by three nimble, determined and extremely well-seasoned explorers.

Prior to creating this documentary, North American photographer and filmmaker Brent Winebrenner had worked on editorial and commercial  assignments in more than 70 countries.  Guatemalan Field Producers Jose Antonio Gonzales and Emilio Faillace had a combined 45 years of experience guiding travel clients throughout Central America.  They knew their country and its culture like the proverbial back of their hands.  When they leaned on their contacts and connections, doors opened.  Thanks to the support of an angel named Elsie YiDonoy, we criss-crossed the country, chasing the leads and stories that grew into the film.

Little by little, the dexterity and determination paid off.  The pieces came together, the vision was fulfilled and the long hours were rewarded.  The film has been enthusiastically received by numerous live audiences and was recently accepted for PBS broadcast beginning in the fall 2022.

If you have an interest in Guatemala, please don’t be shy.  We would love to hear from you.

 

 

Our Approach

 

Guatemala: On the Edge of Discovery was produced on the thinnest of shoestrings by a small crew of three curious, well-seasoned explorers.

Prior to making of this film, North American Photographer and Filmmaker Brent Winebrenner had worked on numerous projects in more than 70 countries.  Guatemalan Field Producers Jose Antonio Gonzales and Emilio Faillace had a combined 45 years of experience guiding travel clients throughout Central America.  They knew their country and its culture like the proverbial back of their hands.

Because our resources were scarce, we had to be nimble, creative and politely persistent in our pursuit of interviews and opportunities.  Most importantly, we were driven to create a film of lasting value, something that told an authentic story of this incredibly diverse, complicated landscape.

Jose and Emilio leaned on their contacts and connections, pulled threads and opened doors.  Thanks to the support of an angel named Elsie YiDonoy, we were able to criss-cross the country, running down leads and chasing rumors.

Little by little, the dexterity and determination paid off.  The pieces came together, the vision was fulfilled and the long hours were rewarded.  The film has been very well received by numerous live audiences and has sold into both public and university library systems.

Most recently, the film was accepted for broadcast on PBS, beginning with National Hispanic Heritage Month in September 2022.

If you have an interest in Guatemala, please don’t be shy.  We would love to hear from you.

 

 

Our Approach

 

Guatemala: On the Edge of Discovery was produced on the thinnest of shoestrings by a small crew of three curious, well-seasoned explorers.

Prior to making of this film, North American Photographer and Filmmaker Brent Winebrenner had worked on numerous projects in more than 70 countries.  Guatemalan Field Producers Jose Antonio Gonzales and Emilio Faillace had a combined 45 years of experience guiding travel clients throughout Central America.  They knew their country and its culture like the proverbial back of their hands.

Because our resources were scarce, we had to be nimble, creative and politely persistent in our pursuit of interviews and opportunities.  Most importantly, we were driven to create a film of lasting value, something that told an authentic story of this incredibly diverse, complicated landscape.

Jose and Emilio leaned on their contacts and connections, pulled threads and opened doors.  Thanks to the support of an angel named Elsie YiDonoy, we were able to criss-cross the country, running down leads and chasing rumors.

Little by little, the dexterity and determination paid off.  The pieces came together, the vision was fulfilled and the long hours were rewarded.  The film has been very well received by numerous live audiences and has sold into both public and university library systems.

Most recently, the film was accepted for broadcast on PBS, beginning with National Hispanic Heritage Month in September 2022.

If you have an interest in Guatemala, please don’t be shy.  We would love to hear from you.

 

TYPE: brent@brentwinebrenner.com

TALK: 805.570.9555

“The most important thing about migration, no matter the time period in human history, is the exchange of ideas.”

Liwy Gracioso, Professor of Anthropology, University of San Carlos Guatemala